Econ306

Notices

Outline

The topics to be covered are partly listed below. The readings will be updated (and augmented) as the course proceeds, so make sure to check here for updates.

There will be four assignments, due dates tba. You will need to hand in completed versions of the assignments, then you will be expected to correct your exam and resubmit it the week later. Assignments are worth 20% of the final mark. The midterm and final are each worth 40% of the final mark. The midterm will be held is tba.

To prepare for the course, make sure you understand the mathematics that is described in the Math Tutorial below. There is no required textbook for the course. Many of the lectures cover material that is covered in Preston McAfee's online text, but the readings that are listed (and will be listed) here are all that is required for the course. You can get the pdf version of McAfee's book at http://www.mcafee.cc/Introecon/IEA.pdf. There is a printed version with nicer graphs and additional problems that you can get from http://www.introecon.com, but you shouldn't need this, and we will only follow a small bit of the book.

Math Preparation

  • This link leads to a math tutorial written by Martin Osborne at U of Toronto. It contains most of what you will need to know about math as an economics student. Browse through to refresh your knowledge, then go back to it when you encounter a mathematical concept that you don't understand. Martin Osborne's Tutorial.
  • This year we'll also be doing a little computer algebra. The simplest way to follow is to get yourself an account on at cocalc.com. You can look at the introductory video there to get an idea of what it does. The component we'll be using this year is sagemath, which you can install on your own computer if you like (I have it on all the computers I use). You can download it from sagemath.org. It can be difficult to install so don't spend too much time on it, use colcalc.com instead.
  • Basic Game Theory - the first part of the course covers basic game theory. It then proceeds to show you how this theory is used in some very well known economics problems.
  • Matching and Deferred Acceptance
  • Auctions